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dc.contributor.authorKim, Sueyon
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-23T19:42:06Z
dc.date.available2017-02-23T19:42:06Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/10460
dc.description.abstractThe study adopted phenomenology in an attempt to document genuine and authentic accounts from Korean-New Zealanders who had experienced psychological distress and utilised relevant mental health support systems. Most available studies on Korean immigrants' mental health issues have been conducted in the US, and there is relatively little research on Korean-New Zealanders' experience of psychological difficulties. The study found that among the various and well-known challenges an immigration process usually entails feelings of loneliness, alienation, and isolation in particular triggered a degenerated state of mental health in Korean-New Zealanders. The study also found that contrary to the findings of previous studies, stigma and discrimination supposedly attached to mental ill-health did not play a major role in deterring Korean-New Zealanders from accessing and utilising relevant mental health services. Instead, knowledge about mental health and ill-health and information about available service facilities were found to be more pertinent in the utilisation of relevant professional help in a timely manner.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_US
dc.subjectMentally illen_US
dc.subjectKoreans -- Psychologyen_US
dc.titleAbsolute solitude of the alien mind : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Social Policy at Massey Universityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSocial Policyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorMassey Universityen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M. A.)en_US


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