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dc.contributor.authorAldridge, Gail Helen
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-15T21:55:48Z
dc.date.available2018-01-15T21:55:48Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/12598
dc.descriptionAppendices A, B, D, E. contain newspaper clippings which have been removed due to copyright restrictions. Please see print copy held in Library.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe focus of this research will be on gender relations that affect the organisational processes of golf in New Zealand. This area of research is of interest to me because during my experience both as a financial member of a private golf club and as a woman, I have experienced restrictions in the availability of playing opportunities. As an avid sportsperson I decided to play the game of golf in the late 1990s. Initially, I took up the game as a replacement sport due to a severe leg injury I received while playing squash; hence I now limit my involvement in sports that involve sudden movements and quick changes of direction. I have been involved with a large number of sporting organisations. Being a white New Zealand female, then in my late 30s, I found the traditional and reserved nature of the golf environment both fascinating and frustrating. For example, the times when women are allowed to play are restricted to specific times of the day during the working week and weekends. This format is known as the designated playing times for women and normally represent a smaller time percentage of the week when compared to the times that men are assigned as specific to them for the playing of golf. Generally, golf clubs perceived women as additional members, and their membership is considered as an associated membership rather than a full-playing and financial membership. This perception was reflected in the dollar value that women paid for their membership fees as they generally paid a lesser amount than did men (Appendix A). The assumption was that because women did not pay the same as men they did not therefore have the right to full access to the course and resources. The limited membership for women meant that golf clubs were perceived as being organised and controlled by men for the benefit of men and their golf, and women's golf was considered secondary to the development of the club membership and the promotion of the game (Alliss, 1989; Campbell, 1986). Having talked with a number of women members and women from other clubs it became apparent to me that the majority of clubs at that time operated in this manner and very few had what is now known in golfing circles as "equal rights" for men and women. [From Introduction]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectGolfen_US
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_US
dc.subjectSocial aspectsen_US
dc.subjectSex discrimination in sportsen_US
dc.titleGolf : gentlemen only ladies forbidden, or is it golden oldies live forever? : a 152.800 (100 point) research thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Business Studies at Massey Universityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorMassey Universityen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Business Studies (M.B.S.)en_US


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