Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPercival, Neil Seeley
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-07T01:52:09Z
dc.date.available2018-09-07T01:52:09Z
dc.date.issued1972
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/13744
dc.description.abstractThe area of lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) in New Zealand has increased rapidly in recent years as farmers have recognized the role it can play in farming enterprises (Table I). There are several reasons to account for this increase: (i) A gross margin analysis of lucerne as a cash crop shows a return that is equal to or greater than for comparable crops such as barley or peas (Tocker, 1970; Lamb, 1969; Anon., 1970). (ii) Lucerne has a greater versatility than other crops as it can bo utilized in several ways to produce many final products (Fig. 1). (iii) Lucerne provides a more assured feed supply than conventional rye grass/clover pastures in those areas subject to droughts and with light soils (Oliver, 1971). [FROM INTRODUCTION]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectAlfalfa -- Pests and diseasesen_US
dc.subjectPhoma medicaginisen_US
dc.titleA study of seed-borne aspects of the spring black stem disease of lucerne : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Agricultural Science at Massey Universityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorMassey Universityen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Agricultural Science (M. Agr. Sc.)en_US


Files in this item

Icon
Icon

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record