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dc.contributor.authorSnowden, Mary Jennifer
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-21T23:04:44Z
dc.date.available2012-06-21T23:04:44Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/3508
dc.description.abstractThe rationale for conducting this research is embedded in the articles of The Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tīrītī o Waitangi 2.3), the cornerstone of the partnership between Māori and Pākehā. Te Tīrītī promotes research set in a peculiarly Āotearoa New Zealand context where biculturalism is seen as promoting a dignified, respectful coexistence of Māori and Pākehā in which both languages cultures and ways of life are acknowledged and valued (Vasil, 2000). In the context of this work the word biculturalism concerns the cultural being of Māori and Pākehā alike. Though the word biculturalism appears in the New ZeaIand Curriculum, the works explored in the process of undertaking this research did not name biculturalism as existing in New Zealand schools, hence the paucity of up-to-date references. Using aspects of Kaupapa Māori (Smith, 1997) as the research method the research aimed to develop a better understanding around the implementation of te reo Māori and tikanga Māori to promote biculturalism in Āotearoa New Zealand mainstream schools today. The historical context that foregrounds biculturalism and the educational policy that influenced the growth and development of biculturalism were also taken into account. In endeavouring to understand and define the shape and form of biculturalism a small group of teachers (Te Whānau Rangahau) agreed to share their ideas around the tensions, successes, enablers and challenges involved in ‘creating a space’ for the implementation of te Māori (Māori language) and tikanga Māori (Māori culture and values) to nurture and assist biculturalism. Keeping within the framework of Kaupapa Māori the kairangahau (researcher) felt ‘kanohi ki te kanohi’ (face to face discussion) was both relevant and appropriate. The use of focussed conversations and individual interviews provided a unique opportunity to identify key influences on teacher willingness to engage in discourse around biculturalism. An opportunity to determine essential elements that need to be present to allow biculturalism to be nurtured through to fruition was also captured. This thesis found that the perception of including te reo Māori and tikanga Māori in Āotearoa New Zealand mainstream schools to encourage true biculturalism continues to be complicated and worked through institutional and social practices. These create, maintain and perpetuate a dominant ideology that maintains a monolingual, monocultural Pākehā curriculum.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectBiculturalismen
dc.subjectBicultural educationen
dc.subjectMulticultural educationen
dc.subjectMaori culture in educationen
dc.subjectTe reo Maorien
dc.subjectTikanga Maorien
dc.subjectMaori languageen
dc.titleKua tae kē tatou? : Tikanga ā rua i roto i ngā kura auraki o Āotearoa = Are we there yet? Biculturalism in New Zealand mainstream schools : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Education (Adult Education) at Massey Universityen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.disciplineAdult Educationen
thesis.degree.grantorMassey Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Education (M.Ed.)en


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