Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAshton, Peter Robert
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T02:28:46Z
dc.date.available2012-09-05T02:28:46Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/3773
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines lay understandings of addiction in the context of academic and clinical understandings and how these discourses are encapsulated in the treatment modalities available to persons experiencing addictive behaviour. It examines the tensions that exist in the treatment sector due to diverse ‘expert’ understandings of the addictive process and the very ‘construct’ of addiction. Participants’ narratives exposed the mutually constitutive nature of lay and professional discourses but also suggested that such use of narratives in clinical settings may have utility in the alleviation of addictive behaviours. However, the predominance of the medical model of addiction within the New Zealand treatment sector, and an increasing focus on highly manualised brief treatment modalities, may not be conducive to solutions that are deemed ‘creative’ rather than ‘corrective’ and give ‘voice’ and credence to the understandings of clients.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectSubstance abuseen
dc.subjectAddictionen
dc.subjectAddictsen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.titleStories of addiction : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology [at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand]en
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorMassey Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)en


Files in this item

Icon
Icon

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record