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dc.contributor.authorPhelan, Sean
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-11T21:24:29Z
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-06T21:26:06Z
dc.date.available2015-08-11T21:24:29Z
dc.date.available2016-03-06T21:26:06Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationPhelan, S. (2014). Critiquing neoliberalism: Three interrogations and a defense. In LA. Lievrouw (Ed.) Challenging Communication Research. (pp. 27 - 41). Pieterlen, Switzerland: Peter Langen_US
dc.description.abstractLooked at broadly, we can identify two distinct discourses about neoliberalism in communication and media studies and elsewhere. The first deploys the term to enact a familiar critical narrative, where neoliberalism signifies a social order dominated by the logic of the market. This narrative has been given different inflections in communication and media research. Neoliberalism has functioned as a descriptive and explanatory category in analyses of topics such as infotainment (Thussu, 2007), media ownership (Herman & McChesney, 1997), multiculturalism (Lentin & Titley, 2011), reality television (Ouellette & Hay, 2008), political marketing (Savigny, 2008), intellectual property rights (Hesmondhalgh, 2008), and the cultural politics of voice (Couldry, 2010). Others have examined the communicative dynamics of “free market” regimes without explicitly deploying the term “neoliberalism” (Aune, 2001). More generally, the role of media and communication practices in the ideological constitution of neoliberalism is taken for granted in the wider literature (see Birch & Mykhnenko, 2010; Harvey, 2005). [First paragraph.]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPeter Lang Publishing Inc.en_US
dc.subjectNeoliberalismen_US
dc.subjectCommunication and media studiesen_US
dc.titleCritiquing “Neoliberalism”: Three Interrogations and a Defenseen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.identifier.elements-id213980
dc.identifier.harvestedMassey_Dark
dc.identifier.harvestedMassey_Dark


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