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dc.contributor.authorPhelan, Sean
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-03T00:21:40Z
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-06T22:25:54Z
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-07T13:57:42Z
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.date.available2010-03-03T00:21:40Z
dc.date.available2016-03-06T22:25:54Z
dc.date.available2016-09-07T13:57:42Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationPhelan, S. (2008). "Democracy, the academic field and the (New Zealand) journalistic habitus." Studies in language and capitalism(3/4): 161-180.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1757-5974
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/9699
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between journalism and the academy is historically fraught. Any mention of the word ‘theory’ is only likely to exacerbate these tensions, since it perhaps signifies, most clearly, the division between both identities. Drawing on the social theory of Pierre Bourdieu, this paper considers, with particular empirical reference to the New Zealand context, the often antagonistic relationship between the ‘journalistic field’ and the ‘academic field’. I examine how academic identities are sometimes represented ‘fantasmatically’ (Glynos and Howarth, 2007) in journalistic discourse and explore the contradictions between journalism’s official commitment to democratic values and the desire of at least some journalists to silence or lampoon academic voices, or insist that theoretical reflection is somehow incompatible with good journalism. The articulation of particular journalistic identities is contextualised with reference to the more ‘objective’ logic of the New Zealand journalistic field and, in particular, the structuring of its concrete relationship with the academic field through journalism education programmes. Although the culturally sedimented practices precluding the possibility of a different inter-field dynamic are considerable, I conclude by ‘visualising’ an alternative relationship, one constituted, on all sides, by what Williams Connolly (2005) characterises as a properly democratic ethos of ‘agonistic respect’ across difference.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherStudies in language and capitalismen_US
dc.subjectJournalismen_US
dc.subjectAcademyen_US
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_US
dc.subject.otherFields of Research::420000 Language and Culture::420300 Cultural Studies::420304 Screen and media studiesen_US
dc.titleDemocracy, the academic field and the (New Zealand) journalistic habitusen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.harvestedMassey_Dark
dc.identifier.harvestedMassey_Dark


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