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dc.contributor.authorPan, Siwen (Addison)
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-26T02:11:32Z
dc.date.available2016-09-26T02:11:32Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/9900
dc.descriptionListed in 2016 Dean's List of Exceptional Thesesen
dc.description.abstractThe well-known jury paradox – the more demanding the hurdle for conviction is, the more likely it is that a jury will convict an innocent defendant – heavily relies on Bayesian updating. However, with ambiguous information (e.g., a forensic test with accuracy of 60%, or more), standard Bayesian updating becomes invalid, challenging the existence of this paradox. By developing novel theoretical models and by testing their predictions in laboratory settings, this thesis advances our understanding of how individuals process more realistically imprecise measures of information reliability and how this impacts on information aggregation for the group decision-making. Hence, our findings inform the institutional design of collective deliberation, from small to large group decision-making.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectResearch Subject Categories::SOCIAL SCIENCES::Business and economics::Economicsen_US
dc.titleFrontiers of decision theory : This dissertation is submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Economics, School of Economics and Finance (Albany) Massey Universityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorMassey Universityen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosopy (Ph.D.)en_US


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