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dc.contributor.authorBole, John
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-07T02:23:01Z
dc.date.available2016-10-07T02:23:01Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/9928
dc.description.abstractIn June 2013, Edward Snowden disclosed the extent of mass surveillance conducted across entire societies by five Western Governments. Snowden apparently hoped to generate a global debate on the appropriateness of these activities and the risk /reward trade-offs that society was being asked to make. Snowden seems to have either overestimated the concern of the average person or misunderstood their current level of understanding and acceptance of surveillance. Either way, the debate was short. In general, society seemed to register a level of disquiet but no specific concern. This paper seeks to determine if the disquiet is a consequence of human morality and to identify any specific moral concern.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectResearch Subject Categories::HUMANITIES and RELIGION::History and philosophy subjects::Philosophy subjectsen_US
dc.titleECHELON: Espionage without ethics : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Philosophy at Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealanden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorMassey Universityen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)en_US


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