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dc.contributor.authorKim, JEen_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, JKen_US
dc.date.available2012-05-01en_US
dc.date.issued2012-05-01en_US
dc.identifierhttp://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/ap10/apacr_vol10_1011042.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.citationAsia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research, 2012, 10 pp. 23 - 25en_US
dc.description.abstractThe belief that there is a relationship between skirt length and the state of the economy is strongly established among laypeople. In this paper, we examine the impact of the perception of financial status on skirt length preference. Using the “Environmental Security Hypothesis” as a theoretical framework, we predict that people will prefer short to long skirts when they perceive their financial status as good. Two experiments demonstrate that consumers’ preference for short (vs. long) skirts is systematically changed by different perceptions of financial status. Furthermore, this preference occurred due to their perceived need for security.en_US
dc.format.extent23 - 25en_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Consumer Researchen_US
dc.relation.urihttp://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/ap10/apacr_vol10_1011042.pdfen_US
dc.titleSkirt length theory: The impact of perceived financial status on skirt length preferenceen_US
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.citation.volume10en_US
dc.description.confidentialfalseen_US
dc.identifier.elements-id350795
dc.relation.isPartOfAsia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Researchen_US
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Business
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Business/School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing
dc.identifier.harvestedMassey_Dark
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/ap10/apacr_vol10_1011042.pdfen_US


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