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dc.contributor.authorGillespie-Gray, Jasmine
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-01T01:07:03Z
dc.date.available2017-11-01T01:07:03Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/12215
dc.description.abstractThe use of animal abuse as a coercive control technique within intimate partner violence is found in nearly half of all violent relationships. Concern for their animals’ well-being, fear for their own safety and difficulty finding temporary animal accommodation leads to women remaining in these relationships. Te Whare Tiaki Wahine Refuge is the only women’s refuge in New Zealand that makes formal provision for animals at their safe houses, enabling women and animals to leave violence together. This research explores the relationship women have with their animals within the context of intimate partner violence, positions animals as victims of family violence themselves, and asks why the service Te Whare Tiaki Wahine Refuge offers is important in enabling women and their animals to leave family violence together. Three women who had animals and were residing at Te Whare Tiaki Wahine Refuge, two Te Whare Tiaki Wahine Refuge social workers and four Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals staff volunteered to participate in conversational interviews that were focused on women’s relationships with their animals and experiences of animal abuse and intimate partner violence. The provision of accommodation for animals leaving violence was investigated The interviews were voice-recorded, transcribed and analysed using feminist standpoint epistemology and Riessman’s (1993) method of narrative inquiry. The analysis represents the strength of women’s relationships with their animals and the importance of them being able to leave their violent relationships together. Animals were positioned as victims of family violence within this research, resulting from the animals’ experiences of physical abuse, purposeful neglect and emotional suffering. Women were found to generally position their animals to be part of the family and an important source of comfort, unconditional love and companionship, especially during difficult times. Having these animals at the safe house with them meant that the women were able to settle in to the safe house better and focus on moving forward with their lives, rather than worrying about their animal’s safety or grieve the loss of, or temporary separation from, their relationship with their animal. This research has highlighted the need for systematic changes to the way 8 we understand family violence and how we view animals within our society, and the need for the development and implementation of programs, like Tiaki have, that enable women, children and animals to leave violence together. Keywords: intimate partner violence, animal abuse, domestic violence, family violence, feminism, Womens Refuge, Te Whare Tiaki Wahine Refuge, Society of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA)en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectWomen's sheltersen_US
dc.subjectAbused womenen_US
dc.subjectServices foren_US
dc.subjectPetsen_US
dc.subjectSocial aspectsen_US
dc.subjectIntimate partner violenceen_US
dc.subjectAnimal abuseen_US
dc.subjectDomestic violenceen_US
dc.subjectFamily violenceen_US
dc.subjectFeminismen_US
dc.subjectWomen's Refugeen_US
dc.subjectTe Whare Tiaki Wahine Refugeen_US
dc.subjectSociety for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animalsen_US
dc.subjectSPCAen_US
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_US
dc.subjectResearch Subject Categories::SOCIAL SCIENCES::Social sciences::Psychologyen_US
dc.titleWomen and their fur-babies : leaving family violence together : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Psychology, at Massey University, Manawatū, New Zealanden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorMassey Universityen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (MSc)en_US


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