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dc.contributor.authorKahu, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorStephens, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorZepke, KGen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeach, Len_US
dc.contributor.editorTaylor and Francisen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-30T01:27:37Z
dc.date.available2014-02-21en_US
dc.date.available2020-01-30T01:27:37Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-21en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Lifelong Education, 2014, pp. ? - ? (20)en_US
dc.identifier.issn1464-519Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/15155
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Lifelong Education on 2014, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02601370.2014.884177en_US
dc.description.abstractStudent engagement, a student’s emotional, behavioural and cognitive connection to their study, is widely recognized as important for student achievement. Influenced by a wide range of personal, structural and sociocultural factors, engagement is both unique and subjective. One important structural factor shown in past research to be a barrier for distance students is access to quality space and time. This qualitative study followed 19 mature-aged distance students and their families, exploring how they learned to manage their space and time throughout their first semester at university. Institutions often claim that distance study and the increased use of technology overcomes barriers of space and time; however, the findings from this study suggest it merely changes the nature of those barriers. The ideal space and time for these students was individual and lay at the intersection of three, sometimes competing, demands: study, self and family. A critical influence on success is family support, as is access to financial resources. Learning what constitutes ideal space and time for engagement is an important part of the transition to university. The institution has a vital role to play in aiding this process by ensuring flexibility of course design is maintained, providing more flexible advice and targeting support at this important issue.en_US
dc.format.extent? - ? (20)en_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)en_US
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/6841
dc.relation.replaces123456789/6841
dc.titleSpace and time to engage: Mature-aged distance students learn to fit study into their livesen_US
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02601370.2014.884177en_US
dc.description.confidentialfalseen_US
dc.identifier.elements-id201189
dc.relation.isPartOfInternational Journal of Lifelong Educationen_US
dc.description.publication-statusPublisheden_US
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Humanities and Social Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Humanities and Social Sciences/School of Psychology
dc.identifier.harvestedMassey_Dark
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
dc.subject.anzsrc1301 Education Systemsen_US


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