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dc.contributor.authorTowers, AJen_US
dc.contributor.authorFlett, RAen_US
dc.contributor.authorHill, SRen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlpass, FMen_US
dc.coverage.spatialFremantle, WAen_US
dc.date.available2008-11-18en_US
dc.date.issued2008-11-18en_US
dc.identifier.citation2008en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroductionNew life stages promote new life goals and our most intense regrets should change in relation to our new goals and priorities.Research shows that 'Work' and 'Education' regrets are more common for older adults, who also tend to regret their inactions more than their actions. However, past research focuses in frequency and fails to indicate which regrets are actually more intense.We still don't know whether regret intensity changes with time and whether our most frequent regrets are also our most intense. Furthermore, we don't know whether regret-reducing processes, such as justification, are employed differentially across the life-span.en_US
dc.source7th National Conference of Emerging Researchers in Ageing "Shaping Research Landscapes"en_US
dc.titleThe changing nature of life regretsen_US
dc.typePoster
dc.date.start-date2008-11-18en_US
dc.identifier.elements-id35356
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Health
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Health/School of Public Health
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Humanities and Social Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Humanities and Social Sciences/PVC's Office - College Humanities and Social Services
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Humanities and Social Sciences/School of Psychology
pubs.notesNot knownen_US


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