Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Anne Frances
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-06T01:59:49Z
dc.date.available2017-01-06T01:59:49Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/10203
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is a textual study of feminist Christian and sociological perspectives and is complemented by a small oral history project, which has been carried out using a feminist methodological framework. The research focuses on some strategies worked out by a selected number of Christian feminists in three different denominational groups as they individually negotiate traditional Church structures of beliefs and practices I identify several specific ways in which these women deal with the dissonance and conflict they acknowledge and encounter as a result of their retaining their Christian beliefs and practices alongside feminist perspectives. Their theoretical approach to the Christian tradition is situated within the scholarly frameworks developed by Christian feminists thinkers explored in this thesis. In particular Ruether and Fiorenza, who have written substantially about the experience of feminists remaining within the church and attempting to remedy the patriarchal practices and belief systems that have disempowered women for two millennia are used to understand the choices of the interviewees. I name this approach 'reformist' and contrast it briefly with a second broad strategy, sometimes called the post-Christian or 'revolutionary' approach. Mary Daly exemplifies this position and argues that there is no place for women within the androcentrism of Christianity and its misogynist practices. Principally a study of feminist approaches to gendered religious experience, this research explores how and why some selected feminist Christians in New Zealand live with (or decline to live with) the conflict their feminism presents to their Christianity. The fieldwork is situated within an examination of sociological perspectives on the social roles and functions of religion. Specifically, I discuss a range of differing views about the extent to which religion both benefits and disadvantages groups marked by gender. The gender analysis central to this thesis is established through a discussion of how differing feminist approaches to gender relations influence both feminist sociology and feminist Christian thinking.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_US
dc.subjectWomen in Christianityen_US
dc.subjectFeminism -- Religious aspects -- Christianityen_US
dc.subjectPatriarchy -- Religious aspects -- Christianityen_US
dc.titleFeminist Christians : a conflict resolved? : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Women's Studies at Massey Universityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineWomen's Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorMassey Universityen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M. A.)en_US


Files in this item

Icon
Icon

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record