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dc.contributor.authorChang, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorHsu, Wen_US
dc.coverage.spatialSydney, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.citationpp. 1 - 62en_US
dc.description.abstractWe find that analyst forecasts are more optimistic and have larger errors near holidays, but more pessimistic and have smaller errors when there is a disaster with significant fatalities. These results are neither explained by sentiment associated with contemporaneous economic conditions, nor by under-reaction or over-reaction to more bad news released on days immediately before weekends or holidays. Overall, our results are consistent with the notion that when analysts are in a positive (negative) mood, they generally make more positively (negatively) biased and less (more) accurate forecasts.en_US
dc.format.extent1 - 62en_US
dc.relation.urihttp://fma.org/Sydney/SydneyProgram.htmen_US
dc.source2016 FMA Asia/Pacific Conferenceen_US
dc.titleMood and analyst optimism and accuracyen_US
dc.typeConference Paper
dc.identifier.elements-id287268
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/Massey Business School
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/Massey Business School/School of Economics and Finance
dc.identifier.harvestedMassey_Dark
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
pubs.confidentialfalseen_US
pubs.finish-date2016-07-15en_US
pubs.start-date2016-07-13en_US


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