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dc.contributor.authorScott, Amy-Kate
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-08T22:11:33Z
dc.date.available2016-12-08T22:11:33Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/10062
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study is to investigate the relationships between Emotional Intelligence (EI) and demands, coping and outcomes in a transactional stress process (Lazarus & Folkman, 1984). The specific focus is whether EI acts to mediate or moderate any of the relationships in the stress process. The secondary objective is to explore the relationships between workplace demands, coping and the outcome variables of job satisfaction and psychological health. The sample comprised of 186 New Zealand professional staff, from all role levels in industries including banking, insurance, exporting and consulting. The findings indicate that EI partially mediates between pressure from workplace relationships and positive outcomes, suggesting EI is particularly useful in dealing with interpersonal demands in the workplace. EI also mediates relationships between coping and outcomes. There was no support for the moderating role of EI. Such findings demonstrate that EI has an important role to play in the stress process.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectJob stressen_US
dc.subjectEmotional intelligenceen_US
dc.subjectJob satisfactionen_US
dc.titleStress, well-being and emotional intelligence in the workplace : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Psychology at Massey Universityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorMassey Universityen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M. Sc.)en_US


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