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dc.contributor.authorChe Jusoh, Mohd Rahimi bin
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-21T01:22:56Z
dc.date.available2017-06-21T01:22:56Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/11248
dc.descriptionContent from Appendix B removed due to copyright restriction: Che Jusoh, M. R., Morton, R. H., Stannard, S. R., & Mündel, T. (2015). A reliable preloaded cycling time trial for use in conditions of significant thermal stress. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 25(S1), 296en_US
dc.description.abstractWhilst carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion during exercise with heat stress theoretically has some benefits for performance there is a lack of evidence on the effects of complex-CHO on exercise and recovery in warm-humid (tropical) conditions. The aims of this thesis were to investigate the effects of sago feeding on exercise performance, some physiological parameters, substrate metabolism, and thermoregulatory responses in the condition of exercise with thermal stress. The initial experimental study investigated the reliability of two novel laboratory-based cycling protocols in the presence of significant thermal stress. These protocols would then be employed in the second part of this thesis. The data indicate that the 15 min time-trial pre-loaded with 45 min fixed-intensity (Chapter 5, Study A) and 15 min time-trial pre-loaded with 15 min incremental warm-up (Chapter 5, Study B) were highly reliable when using trained, familiarized males under warm-humid environmental conditions. The second part of this thesis describes experiments which investigated the efficacy of an alternative Malaysian-based CHO, sago, on exercise in conditions which replicate the Malaysian environment (warm and humid). Chapter 6 describes a study investigating the effect of sago supplementation before and during exercise in a warm-humid environment. The data collected from this study revealed that pre- and during-sago feeding has no differential effects on exercise performance though sago feeding produced a higher glycaemic response during the hour prior to exercise. However, feeding sago before exercise attenuated the rise in core temperature during exercise compared to the control condition, whilst there was a smaller reduction in plasma volume found when consuming sago during steady-state exercise through reduced whole-body sweating, with a concomitant higher plasma sodium concentration. Heart rate was also higher when sago was ingested either before or during exercise compared to control. Then, Chapter 7 further investigated the utility of sago ingestion as a recovery meal on a subsequent exercise bout in a warm-humid environment. In terms of performance, sago ingestion during short-term recovery seemed to sustain time-trial performance on the second bout of exercise compared to a control condition (no food) where exercise performance degraded. However, no attenuation of physiological, metabolic and thermoregulatory responses was apparent. Coen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectSagoen_US
dc.subjectAthletesen_US
dc.subjectNutritionen_US
dc.subjectSportsen_US
dc.subjectPhysiological aspectsen_US
dc.subjectResearch Subject Categories::INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH AREAS::Sportsen_US
dc.titleThe effects of sago supplementation for exercise in a warm-humid environment : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Health (Sport & Exercise) at Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealanden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSport and Exerciseen_US
thesis.degree.grantorMassey Universityen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US


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