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dc.contributor.authorPerson, Angela C
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-27T23:34:07Z
dc.date.available2017-06-27T23:34:07Z
dc.date.issued1998
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/11378
dc.description.abstractExamined how some children with learning disabilities (LD) sustain higher levels of general self-worth despite academic difficulties. Global self-worth was examined for a relationship with academic self-concept, non-academic self-concept, and perceived social support. Self-concept was additionally examined for any relationships with task performance indicators. Data were collected from 41 students aged between 7 and 15 years using a multitrait-multimethod assessment methodology. Self-concept was assessed by the Self-Perception Profile for Children (Harter, 1985a), and perceived social support was assessed by the Social Support Scale for Children (Harter, 1985b). Task performance was assessed by a battery of academic and motor skill measures. Findings indicated that most LD children in this sample reported low levels of academically based self-concept. However, most also reported high levels of global self-worth. The study found students with high global self-concept perceived they were more competent/adequate in some non-academic domains (e.g., physical appearance and behavioural conduct), and perceived being socially supported, particularly by teachers. Perceptions of academic self-concept were not found to be as related to perceptions of global self-concept as non-academic domains. In regression analyses, perceptions of physical appearance followed by perceptions of athletic competence were found to be predictors of global self-worth. No predictors were found to be significant for academic self-concept. Classmate support predicted aspects of social self-concept (i.e., social acceptance). No pattern of significant relationships were found between task performance indicators and various domains of self-concept. Discussion includes using data to dispel myths some may have about the global self-worth of LD children as well as in intervention programmes. This study replicated and extended research in this area. Caveats and recommendations for future research are discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectLearning disabled childrenen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.titleSelf-concept in learning disabled children : relationship to perceived competence, social support and task performance : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science at Massey Universityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorMassey Universityen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M. Sc.)en_US


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