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dc.contributor.authorZintzen, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, MJen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, CDen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, ESen_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart, ALen_US
dc.contributor.authorStruthers, CDen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.date.available2012en_US
dc.date.available2012-09-26en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23119045en_US
dc.identifierPONE-D-12-16350en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One, 2012, 7 (10), pp. e48522 - ?en_US
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Continental slopes are among the steepest environmental gradients on earth. However, they still lack finer quantification and characterisation of their faunal diversity patterns for many parts of the world. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Changes in fish community structure and diversity along a depth gradient from 50 to 1200 m were studied from replicated stereo baited remote underwater video deployments within each of seven depth zones at three locations in north-eastern New Zealand. Strong, but gradual turnover in the identities of species and community structure was observed with increasing depth. Species richness peaked in shallow depths, followed by a decrease beyond 100 m to a stable average value from 700 to 1200 m. Evenness increased to 700 m depth, followed by a decrease to 1200 m. Average taxonomic distinctness △(+) response was unimodal with a peak at 300 m. The variation in taxonomic distinctness Λ(+) first decreased sharply from 50 to 300 m, then increased beyond 500 m depth, indicating that species from deep samples belonged to more distant taxonomic groups than those from shallow samples. Fishes with northern distributions progressively decreased in their proportional representation with depth whereas those with widespread distributions increased. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides the first characterization of diversity patterns for bait-attracted fish species on continental slopes in New Zealand and is an imperative primary step towards development of explanatory and predictive ecological models, as well as being fundamental for the implementation of efficient management and conservation strategies for fishery resources.en_US
dc.format.extente48522 - ?en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.rights2012 Zintzen et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.subjectAnimalsen_US
dc.subjectBiodiversityen_US
dc.subjectEcosystemen_US
dc.subjectFishesen_US
dc.subjectIslandsen_US
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_US
dc.subjectPopulation Dynamicsen_US
dc.titleDiversity and composition of demersal fishes along a depth gradient assessed by baited remote underwater stereo-video.en_US
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.citation.volume7en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0048522en_US
dc.identifier.elements-id182400
dc.relation.isPartOfPLoS Oneen_US
dc.citation.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203en_US
dc.description.publication-statusPublisheden_US
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Sciences/NZ Institute of Advanced Studies
dc.identifier.harvestedMassey_Dark
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
dc.subject.anzsrcMD Multidisciplinaryen_US


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