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dc.contributor.authorMartin, Simon Geoffrey
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-22T01:29:27Z
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.date.available2010-04-22T01:29:27Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/1249
dc.description.abstractThe primary aim of this research is to understand how the multiple levels within networks influence the organising dynamics in an intentionally formed network through the measurement of tie strength. This is a significant contribution because previous research is based on network studies in which only one level is considered, most of the research is conceptually undeveloped in the area. The research also addresses the measurement of the strength of relationships rather than just their existence or non-existence. Furthermore, this study examines intentionally created networks – an area where there is currently very little research. Thus the study is significant because the new data contributes to the marketing research environment and can be presented to examine findings in other research contexts, including the social policy and not-for-profit sectors. To address the aim and context of the study it was necessary to understand a national programme which had global objectives. The research involved a multi-method approach that utilised a single case-study strategy with multiple embedded cases consisting of three interdependent, intentionally formed networks, each with a central broker, in the elite and high-performance sport sector in New Zealand. The overall contributions of the research were: (1) The identification of a new network type, termed here as a structured network. (2) The finding that networks that are intentionally created and managed can be durable and effective, and this is dependent on the role of the central broker. This finding has obvious implications for practitioners involved in such networks and for governments that are interested in creating them. (3) The finding that cross-level pressures influence network effectiveness. (4) The finding that relationships developed at the pre-network formation stage contribute to network effectiveness. (5) And finally, the identification of a new stage of intentional network formation. This stage was taken by the New Zealand government issuing a tender in order to gauge the level of interest and the resources available to provide a network of services before establishing it.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectNetworkingen_US
dc.subjectOrganisational behaviouren_US
dc.subjectSport sectoren_US
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_US
dc.subject.otherFields of Research::350000 Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services::350200 Business and Managementen_US
dc.titleNetworking for gold : a multi-level analysis to explain network organising dynamics : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Marketing at Massey University, Albany Campus, New Zealanden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMarketingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorMassey Universityen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en_US


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