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dc.contributor.authorLangton, Robert John
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-14T23:51:34Z
dc.date.available2018-03-14T23:51:34Z
dc.date.issued1990
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/12965
dc.description.abstractA review of court cases decided under the New Zealand Fair Trading Act 1986 shows that a television advertisement would be found to contravene the Act where it could be shown to convey an implied claim that is false. A review of the literature reveals that a variety of empirical tests have been proposed to determine whether an advertisement conveys an implied claim. A review of legal decisions in the United States, Australia and New Zealand, suggests that the most probative evidence as to whether an advertisement conveys an implied claim is an empirical test using artificial viewing conditions and forced-choice questions. A survey of expert lawyers in New Zealand shows that evidence of such tests is likely to be given substantial weight in litigation under the Fair Trading Act 1986.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectFraudulent Advertisingen_US
dc.subjectMarketing researchen_US
dc.titleThe effect of marketing research evidence in deceptive advertising litigation : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in marketing at Massey Universityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMarketingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorMassey Universityen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph. D.)en_US


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