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dc.contributor.authorMacKay, Cheryl-Anne
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-16T01:26:54Z
dc.date.available2019-05-16T01:26:54Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/14632
dc.description.abstractVocabulary is recognised as a key contributor to literacy development and comprehension. Children cannot make meaning from text if they lack the vocabulary to support what is being read. This study investigated the independent contribution of vocabulary to word recognition, and whether the contribution was direct or indirect through set for variability. A second aim of the study was to determine if a direct relation exists between vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension. Unpublished data from the longitudinal study (Chapman, Arrow, Tunmer, & Braid, 2016) were analysed to find predictive links between vocabulary and later reading outcomes, for a cohort of 374 5-year-old children in New Zealand primary schools. The results identified that word recognition and vocabulary both directly contributed to reading comprehension for these children in the middle of their second year at school. Word recognition explained a greater amount of the shared variance of reading comprehension in the middle of Year 2 as the children were at the stage of still trying to read a range of unfamiliar words. Set for variability was found not to directly contribute to reading comprehension when word recognition was added to the model. This finding suggests that set for variability mediates the relationship between vocabulary and word recognition but not for overall reading comprehension. In terms of practical teaching, it is suggested that language comprehension abilities should be acquired alongside the development of word recognition skills.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectVocabulary -- Study and teaching (Primary) -- New Zealanden_US
dc.subjectWord recognition -- Study and teaching (Primary) -- New Zealanden_US
dc.subjectReading comprehension -- Study and teaching (Primary) -- New Zealanden_US
dc.subjectReading (Primary) -- New Zealanden_US
dc.titleDoes vocabulary influence word recognition and reading comprehension through set for variability? : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Education at Massey University, Manawatū, New Zealanden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Education (MEd)en_US


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