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dc.contributor.authorJoensen, Clare
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-18T23:24:56Z
dc.date.available2020-02-18T23:24:56Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/15212
dc.description.abstractWeight loss surgery is increasingly being used to combat obesity, resulting in recipients becoming more visible in society. This in turn facilitates the normalising of what once would have been considered a radical medical procedure and the proliferation of discourse that more often than not measures success against models of slimness and appearance and underplays the downsides of surgery. Through the use of a narrative phenomenological approach, this research explores the experiences of surgery recipients, specifically Māori women, and asks the question; ‘how does the embodiment of radical change impact on relationality, interiority, conviviality, and ‘being in the world’?’ Through learning from Māori women, this research also explores how being Māori shapes experience both before and after surgery and in doing so, contrasts to literature which frames experiences of indigenous women through a Foucauldian lens of colonialism. I argue that, as Māori, these women are supported by the collective – significantly so – but also have to grapple with and push back negative discourses that leak into their world. I also argue that life post-surgery is entangled with both liminality and potentialities; precarious, unsettled and unsettling, while being simultaneously imbued with hope and focused towards an extending future. Surgery does transform bodies through enabling tremendous weight loss but also transfigures far more than it is designed to do.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectObesityen_US
dc.subjectSurgeryen_US
dc.subjectSocial aspectsen_US
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_US
dc.subjectOverweight womenen_US
dc.subjectWomen, Maorien_US
dc.subjectAttitudesen_US
dc.subjectWāhineen_US
dc.subjectAra kaien_US
dc.subjectKaien_US
dc.subjectManaen_US
dc.subjectAnthropologyen_US
dc.subjectAotearoaen_US
dc.subjectbariatric surgeryen_US
dc.subjectbecomingen_US
dc.subjectcommensalityen_US
dc.subjectconvivialityen_US
dc.subjecteatingen_US
dc.subjectfooden_US
dc.subjectMāori womenen_US
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_US
dc.subjectPhenomenologyen_US
dc.subjectweight loss surgeryen_US
dc.titleBeing big, becoming small : conversations with Māori women about weight loss surgery : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Social Anthropology at Massey University, Albany, Aotearoa, New Zealanden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSocial Anthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (MA)en_US


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