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dc.contributor.authorLee, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorKee, YJen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, SSYen_US
dc.contributor.authorJan, Gen_US
dc.date.accessioned2023-01-19T19:34:41Z
dc.date.available2023-01-09en_US
dc.date.available2023-01-19T19:34:41Z
dc.date.issued2023-01-09en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Management and Organization, 2023en_US
dc.identifier.issn1833-3672en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/17940
dc.description.abstractThe literature on the job demands–resources (JD-R) theory has flourished for the past decade due to the theory's simplicity and its applications in many areas of work life. However, the literature is lacking on how leaders can utilize this theory to manage employees, especially in the Asian leadership context. Using the JD-R theory, the current study investigated each aspect of paternalistic leadership (i.e., benevolent leadership, authoritarian leadership and moral leadership) and its influence on employees' job resources (i.e., work meaningfulness and influence at work), job demands (i.e., emotional and cognitive demands), work engagement, burnout and the processes involved. Four hundred and thirty-one (431) full-time working employees (mean age: 31.58; female: 57.8%) from various organizations in Malaysia participated in the study. Using structural equation modelling, the study's results showed that the benevolent aspect of paternalistic leadership was related to higher work engagement and lower burnout through work meaningfulness (but not through influence at work). In contrast, the authoritarian aspect of paternalistic leadership was related to higher burnout through emotional demands (but not through cognitive demands), while the moral leadership aspect had no significant relationship to employees' job demands or job resources, with a mediation process not found in either relationship. Overall, the study revealed three contrasting mechanisms for each aspect of paternalistic leadership and suggested how paternalistic leadership may be practised in Asian countries.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-management-and-organization/article/investigating-aspects-of-paternalistic-leadership-within-the-job-demandsresources-model/818E2A7505D5DE870B9C25C0E584C423en_US
dc.rights© The Author(s), 2023 CC BY 4.0en_US
dc.subjectburnouten_US
dc.subjectcognitive demandsen_US
dc.subjectemotional demandsen_US
dc.subjectwork meaningfulnessen_US
dc.subjectinfluence at worken_US
dc.subjectJD-R theoryen_US
dc.subjectMalaysiaen_US
dc.subjectpaternalistic leadershipen_US
dc.subjectwork engagementen_US
dc.titleInvestigating aspects of paternalistic leadership within the job demands–resources modelen_US
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/jmo.2022.95en_US
dc.description.confidentialfalseen_US
dc.identifier.elements-id458798
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Management and Organizationen_US
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Humanities and Social Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Humanities and Social Sciences/School of Psychology
dc.identifier.harvestedMassey_Dark
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
dc.subject.anzsrc1303 Specialist Studies in Educationen_US
dc.subject.anzsrc1503 Business and Managementen_US
dc.subject.anzsrc1505 Marketingen_US


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