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dc.contributor.authorCarruthers, Stephen James Stiūbhart
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-10T21:41:39Z
dc.date.available2016-05-10T21:41:39Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10179/7760
dc.description.abstractIt is over a century since World War One impacted on the lives of those who taught at or attended both Otago High School and Waitaki Boys’ High School. The war lasted from1914- 1918, yet for many of those who participated their schooling occurred before the declaration of hostilities. It is mainly this pre-war period that this thesis will concentrate on. This thesis examines how Otago High School and Waitaki Boys’ High School encouraged their students to lead lives that were based in duty and service. It focuses on the period 1890 through until the early 1920s and looks at how both schools approached the issue of student development for life beyond the classroom. They did this by using local and international events, especially those that were Empire and nationally focused, to encourage their students to lead dutiful lives. Students were taken on excursions to visit public shows of loyalty or, in some cases, teacher-led discussions guided students towards adopting values that fitted into societal expectations. The promotion of sport was another method used to encourage students to lead a dutiful life and, along with military training, it gave a practical application to the concepts of duty and service. As World War One unfolded both schools used this event to encourage their current and former students to ’do their bit’. It is at this point that the thesis examines five former students of Otago High School and Waitaki Boys’ High School and determines that there was some influence from their former school on the decision to enlist. In the main this was as a result of the schooling these Old Boys had received. The study of how schools influenced their students over the period of this thesis is an area seldom trod by historians. This thesis highlights the need to explore this area further, because war is not just about generals and army’s, it is also about communities, values and beliefs.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMassey Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe Authoren_US
dc.subjectNew Zealand Armed Forcesen_US
dc.subjectRecruiting, enlistment, etcen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectHigh schoolsen_US
dc.subjectSocial aspectsen_US
dc.subjectBoysen_US
dc.subjectEducation (Secondary)en_US
dc.subjectWorld War, 1914-1918en_US
dc.subjectWorld War Oneen_US
dc.subjectSocial aspectsen_US
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_US
dc.titleDuty to serve?: the role of secondary schools in preparing New Zealand soldiers for enlistment in the First World War : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts (Defence Studies) at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealanden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineDefence Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorMassey Universityen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)en_US


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