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dc.contributor.authorPaddison, CAMen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlpass, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorStephens, Cen_US
dc.coverage.spatialNew Zealanden_US
dc.date.available2010en_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifierhttp://www.psychology.org.nz/cms_show_download.php?id=525en_US
dc.identifier.citationNew Zealand Journal of Psychology, 2010, 39 (1), pp. 45 - 50en_US
dc.identifier.issn0112-109Xen_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the relationships between illness perceptions and illness-related distress among adults with type 2 diabetes. Research participants (N = 615) were randomly selected from a primary care database in New Zealand. Data were collected through a mailed questionnaire survey and review of medical records. The primary outcome was diabetes-related psychological distress measured using the Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) scale. Multiple regression analyses controlling for age, clinical characteristics, and mental health showed that illness perceptions accounted for 15% of differences in distress about diabetes (F change (4,462) = 35.37, p < .001). Poor mental health and illness severity alone do not explain differences in diabetes-related emotional adjustment. Results suggest that ‘making sense’ of diabetes may be central to successfully managing the emotional consequences of diabetes.en_US
dc.format.extent45 - 50en_US
dc.publisherNew Zealand Psychological Societyen_US
dc.titleUsing the common sense model of illness selfregulation to understand diabetes-related distress: The importance of being able to 'make sense' of diabetesen_US
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.citation.volume39en_US
dc.description.confidentialfalseen_US
dc.identifier.elements-id92872
dc.relation.isPartOfNew Zealand Journal of Psychologyen_US
dc.citation.issue1en_US
dc.description.publication-statusPublisheden_US
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Humanities and Social Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Humanities and Social Sciences/School of Psychology
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.psychology.org.nz/cms_show_download.php?id=525en_US
dc.subject.anzsrc1701 Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.anzsrc1702 Cognitive Scienceen_US


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