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dc.contributor.authorCollins, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorGlavovic, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorJohal, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Den_US
dc.contributor.editorFitzgerald, Jen_US
dc.contributor.editorO'Connor, Fen_US
dc.contributor.editorEvans, IMen_US
dc.coverage.spatialNew Zealanden_US
dc.date.available2011en_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifierhttp://www.psychology.org.nz/cms_show_download.php?id=1480en_US
dc.identifier.citationNew Zealand Journal of Psychology, 2011, 40 (4: Special Issue with emphasis on research and practice in the months of earthquakes in Canterbury, New Zealand, from September 2010), pp. 17 - 25en_US
dc.identifier.issn1179-7924en_US
dc.description.abstractEngagement and participation are terms used to describe important processes in a democratic society. However, the definition and understanding of these terms is broad and varied. In a disaster context, community engagement and participation are recognised as important processes to support individual and community recovery. What these terms mean, who is responsible for leading engagement, and the processes that are to be used, are important issues that need to be clarified at the onset of recovery, if not before. Despite this, there are often barriers to community members being involved in the recovery process as active and valued participants. These include governance structures that do not adequately recognise the spectrum of community engagement and the power dynamics of information sharing and decision-making. This article discusses two New Zealand case studies where engagement activities were put in place to contribute to the communities’ post disaster recovery.en_US
dc.format.extent17 - 25en_US
dc.publisherThe New Zealand Psychological Societyen_US
dc.titleCommunity engagement post-disaster: Case studies of the 2006 Matata debris flow and 2010 Darfield earthquake, New Zealanden_US
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.citation.volume40en_US
dc.description.confidentialfalseen_US
dc.identifier.elements-id161095
dc.relation.isPartOfNew Zealand Journal of Psychologyen_US
dc.citation.issue4: Special Issue with emphasis on research and practice in the months of earthquakes in Canterbury, New Zealand, from September 2010en_US
dc.description.publication-statusPublisheden_US
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Humanities and Social Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Humanities and Social Sciences/School of People, Enviroment and Planning
pubs.organisational-group/Massey University/College of Humanities and Social Sciences/School of Psychology
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.psychology.org.nz/cms_show_download.php?id=1480en_US


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